MENU

Celebration kicks off in Asheville to mark grand opening of Moogseum in honor of Bob Moog

moog 2.jpg
If you're wired for sound, the grand opening of the Moogseum and the three-day Moogmentum celebration could indeed be music to your ears. (Photo credit: WLOS staff)

If you're wired for sound, the grand opening of the Moogseum and the three-day Moogmentum celebration could indeed be music to your ears.

"Well, it's kind of mecca for me when it comes to synthesizers," Lee Keely, of Canada, said, taking in the wall-to-wall tribute to Bob Moog on Broadway.

Tuesday, he rediscovered the magic of theremins.

"It's really an interesting instrument," he said, making music at one of eight interactive exhibits.

"I collect instruments, and I also collect cars, so Bob Moog to me is the Henry Ford of synthesizers," Keely said. "He is the guy that created this!"

Moogmentum kicked off Tuesday with appearances at the Masonic Temple just down the street.

"We are bringing three legends to Asheville this week, starting tonight," executive director Michelle Moog-Koussa said. "Herb Deutsch, who was a collaborator on the the original Moog synthesizer, is here. He'll be talking about the prototype with Larry Fast, who's a pioneering synthesist, technologist and historian, and Patrick Moraz, who was a keyboardist for Yes. "

Meanwhile, the Moog Foundation hopes folks will also visit the Moogseum, which doesn't just blind visitors with science. The goal is to give them a glimpse of the man who helped change the course of electronic music.

"The Moogseum was created to bring Bob Moog's legacy alive to all kinds of people and to make the inspiration that he forged throughout his life accessible," Moog-Koussa said.

The replica of the synth pioneer's workbench rings all too familiar.

Back in 2002, I interviewed Mr. Moog after he received a Technical Grammy Award for his innovation.

"The Moog became the catalyst for bands like Emerson, Lake, and Palmer in the 1970s," I explained in my report. "But some purists hated the thought of electronic music. They said keyboards were artificial."

"You don't find violins growing in the forest," Moog said then.

"They know Bob Moog the icon," Moog-Koussa said. "But we are trying to share Bob Moog the person and the ups and downs of his life and his career."

His creation is now an indelible part of the musical landscape, generating Moogmentum that still thrives today.

"It's just amazing to be in here and see all the history," Keeley said.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER