Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes ofwebsite accessibility
MENU

Experts weigh in on historic second impeachment of Pres. Trump, future of politics

President Trump in western North Carolina, 08-24-20
File - August 24, 2020 - President Donald Trump flies into the Asheville Regional Airport ahead of an appearance in Mills River, North Carolina. (Photo credit: WLOS Staff)

As President Donald Trump officially becomes the first American president in history to be impeached twice, experts weigh in on how recent events could impact the future of American politics.

“Anytime you have a mob willing to overpower and injure people to get inside the Capitol to overwhelm and harm Congressional representatives, American democracy has a problem,” Duke University Associate History Professor Adrian Lentz-Smith said.

In a media briefing, three Duke University scholars discussed the challenges the nation faces moving forward.

HOUSE IMPEACHES PRESIDENT TRUMP FOR A HISTORIC SECOND TIME

“One of the things that we have to figure out now is what we are willing to do to preserve our democracy,” Lents-Smith said.

Members of the U.S. House of Representatives took turns debating the impeachment resolution against President Trump on Wednesday, accusing him of inciting insurrection.

“In some ways, this is the way the system should work," Western Carolina University Political Science Professor Chris Cooper said. "Represented members of Congress making a decision, given the information that they have."

Cooper says never before has a United States president faced possible impeachment so close to the end of their term.

He said it is too early to know how the House’s impeachment of Trump will impact the future of Congress under President-elect Joe Biden's administration, but said part of it will depend on how the Republican party responds to it.

Wednesday, U.S. Congressman Madison Cawthorn (R-District 11) spoke out against impeachment, for bipartisanship, he told Congress.

WNC POLITICAL EXPERT WEIGHS IN ON CALLS FOR REP. CAWTHORN'S REMOVAL, POTENTIAL IMPACTS

“Today is a moment for members of Congress to put aside partisan politicking and place people over power," Rep. Cawthorn said. "I urge my colleagues to vote against the divisive impeachment and realize that dividing America will not save this republic."

“I think the Republican party is in a bit of a struggle right now trying to decide whether it is the party of Donald Trump or whether it is the party of conservative ideals,” Cooper said.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER