Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes ofwebsite accessibility
MENU

Why does CDC mention probable COVID-19 cases?

Why does CDC mention probable COVID cases?
FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Lindsey Helkenn, a medical lab technician from Spearfish, conducts a COVID-19 test in Sturgis, S.D. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation’s most troubling hotspots. (Grace Pritchett/Rapid City Journal via AP, File)

News 13's investigative team is working to answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic and its impacts on Western North Carolina.

"Why does the CDC mention cases that are positive and probable? If they are counting probable cases as well, it seems like the numbers are not accurate," a viewer asked News 13’s I-Team Coronavirus Help Desk.

AdventHealth Chief Medical Officer Dr. Teresa Herbert said it all has to do with which COVID-19 test was used. She said the PCR molecular test looks for virus particles and shows whether you have COVID-19. But, she said the other antigen test is less accurate, so it would only be classified as a probable case.

CORONAVIRUS INFORMATION CENTER: TRACK THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS, IMPACTS, AND HEADLINES ABOUT THE PANDEMIC HERE

"When you look at the number reporting probable cases, those probable cases will be ones that tested positive for the antigen. The false positive rate for the antigen test is very, very low. So, if your antigen test is positive, you have to assume that you have COVID-19," Herbert said.

You can submit your questions to Iteam@wlos.com. News 13's Jennifer Emert, Lauren Brigman and Karen Zatkulak will work to get an answer for you.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER